Galway Cycle Bus announces summer Family Cycles

Save some August dates in your diaries for Family Cycles in Oranmore, Renmore and Knocknacarra.

The Galway CycleBus is delighted to announce that they will organise three Family Cycles in August in Oranmore, Renmore and Knocknacarra.

Communities all over the city and county want to establish cycle buses in the absence of safe and protected cycle ways to schools. These family cycles will hopefully make connections between parents and encourage them to establish cycle buses in their own areas. 

In Oranmore on Saturday 22 August, the family cycle will tour the village and take the Maree Road out to Renville Park for a picnic and games. 

In Renmore on Saturday 5 September, a family quiz will be followed by a spin around the residential and amenity areas, and will conclude with a trip to the beach in Ballyloughane for fun and games. 

In Knocknacarra (date TBC), a family cycle around the neighbourhood will finish with a treasure hunt in Barna Woods. 

Parents, schools and local businesses are invited to get involved and contact the Galway CycleBus at [email protected] or on social media. 

These events coincide with the Cycling Rural Collective’s campaign to ‘Get to School on Your Own Fuel’.

Back on the saddle – CycleCoffeeCake pedals to Renmore this August Bank Holiday weekend

CycleCoffeeCake pedals off again this August bank holiday weekend on Saturday 1 August at 10.30am from the Huntsman Inn, College Road. The route will explore quiet and calm routes to and through Renmore, Ballyloughnane beach, and Roscam.

The first CycleCoffeeCake event pedalled from Nimmo’s Pier in the Claddagh to Blackrock and finished and Ground & Co Salthill.

CycleCoffeeCake is a gentle social cycle event for adults of all ages and abilities. People who are new cyclers, nearly-new or who have returned to cycling during coronavirus lockdown are particularly welcome.

For contact tracing purposes, participants must register in advance for CycleCoffeeCake here.

The cycle will last about one hour and end at a local café for coffee, cake and chats.

The Galway CycleBus will host a family cycle in Renmore with more later in August so parents who are considering cycling with their children to Scoil Caitríona and Scoil Dara in just a few weeks time may find that CycleCoffeeCake gives them the boost of confidence they want to feel able and safe cycling within their neighbourhood.

Organiser Martina Callanan says that a remarkable two thirds of participants of CycleCoffeeCake events this summer are women who are new to cycling or have hopped back on the saddle after years, or decades, of absence.

Women are the reason we have a bike boom this summer. It’s almost impossible to buy a new or second hand bike in Galway. Mammies have rediscovered their own joy and freedom in cycling after spending time with their children on bikes during lockdown.

Many want to feel confident again on bikes, and CycleCoffeeCake events shows them quiet routes in their neighbourhoods as well as access to a community of people who want cycling to be a very real and safe option for everyday transport. “

Neasa Bheilbigh of the Galway CycleBus in Knocknacarra says that many parents want their children to cycle to school.

Cycling is quick and independent transport, which saves parents time, and is easy exercise for young people. As we prepare to go back to school, mums, parents and caregivers want safe and quiet cycle routes for their children and teenagers. CycleCoffeeCake is a great way for parents to regain their own confidence on bikes.

Eqre Square is about 12-18 minutes by bike from Renmore and 24-30 minutes from Roscam. Travels times are based on a gentle pace of 16kmph and include wait times at junctions.

Chief Superintendent supports 30km/h speed limit for safer cycling in Galway city

Chief Superintendent Tom Curley gave his support to reduce Galway city speed limit to 30 km/h to make streets safer for everyone at the Joint Policing Committee today, Monday. He was responding to a question from Cllr Níall McNelis, chair of the Joint Policing Committee, who asked for garda support to make Galway’s streets safer for families and older people walking and people cycling. The Chief Superintendent said that a 30 km/h speed limit was already being discussed to improve safety for cycling and is supported by Inspector Peter Conlon and Superintendent Damien Flanagan.

Galway Cycling Campaign warmly welcomes support from the Garda and the Chair of Joint Policing Committee, Níall McNelis, for a 30 km/h speed limit for safer cycling and safer streets for people of all ages and abilities.

This comes after a public meeting last week about the benefits of lower speed limits hosted by Galway Cycling Campaign, which was addressed by Prof Kevin Leyden of NUI Galway, Maria Delaney of Noteworthy, and Mairéad Forsythe of Love 30. Rod King, founder and campaign director of 20’s Plenty for Us, attended the online meeting and said that he will address the annual Road Safety Authority conference in the autumn.

Love 30 to Change Our Streets, a public event about the benefits of lower speed limits, was hosted online by the Galway Cycling Campaign on Wednesday, 17 June 2020

Spokesperson Martina Callanan said lower city speed limits are becoming more common in European cities such as Athens, Milan and Brussels and thanked the Garda for their support.

Slower speeds will give parents peace of mind to bring small children into the city centre to shop and dine, when children play and cycle outside their homes, and as children and teenagers walk and cycle to school. We want to thank An Garda for their support for lower speeds to make Galway a safer and nice place to live, shop, and play.

Martina Callanan, spokesperson for Galway Cycling Campaign

Mairéad Forsythe of Love 30, Ireland’s campaign for lower speed limits, was in attendance at today’s meeting. She commented on the Chief Superintendent’s remarks.

Introducing a 30 km/h speed limit would be a significant achievement for road safety in Galway. It will make our roads safer for people walking, cycling and driving. Most important of all, slower streets make our neighbourhoods more pleasant places to live, work and for children to play.

Mairéad Forsythe of Love 30

Chairperson of Galway Cycling Campaign, Kevin Jennings, also attended and warmly welcomed the support of An Garda for slower speed limits.

The typical road speed limit of 50 km/h does not feel fast if you are behind a windscreen. The research is stark: speed is the biggest contributing factor to road deaths in Ireland. If a person walking is hit by a person driving a car at 50 km/h, there is a 50% chance that person will die. At 60 km/h – that’s only 10 km faster – 9 in 10 pedestrians will die.

Kevin Jennings, chairperson of the Galway Cycling Campaign

He added, “Slower speed limits have an added benefit of improving traffic flow. Scientific models show motor traffic flowing more steadily at lower speeds in congested networks.”

A city with safe streets is one where children can walk, cycle and play

Change Our Streets: public meeting via Zoom

How would you like post-lockdown Galway to be?

Galway Cycling Campaign will host our first public information meeting via Zoom tomorrow evening, Tuesday 12 May at 8pm, to crowdsource ideas for our ‘Change Our Streets’ open conversation with Galway City Council.

Tuesday 12 May, 8pm to 9pm
Join Zoom Meeting
Meeting ID: 850 4519 8216
Password: 548586

‘Doors’ open at 7.45pm.
‘Drinks’ afterwards until 10pm.

A family cycles the traffic-free Dyke Road during coronavirus

We will give an update about the #ChangeOurStreets campaign and we also want your specific suggestions to improve Galway city to facilitate social distancing in residential, recreational, retail areas.

We have ideas – and we want more!

Please test your technology in advance. We are not in a position to give tech support.

We will gather specific suggestions of areas to improve and submit these to Galway City Council. This will deepen our conversation on how we can together ‘Change Our Streets’ to protect the physical well-being and mental health of all residents of all ages and all abilities, especially the very young and those who are vulnerable.