Photocall & launch/ Supermarket Bike Parking Survey with Minister Hildegarde Naughton

Photocall & launch/ Supermarket Bike Parking Survey with Minister Hildegarde Naughton

Galway Cycling Campaign is joined by Minister of State at the Dept. of Climate Action and Transport Hildegarde Naughton to launch the Galway Supermarket Bike Parking Survey.

We know that many of you are living your lives more locally these days and probably using local supermarkets more often than usual. We in Galway Cycling Campaign want to find out about the quality of bike parking at these supermarkets.

The survey will establish a baseline, highlight areas for improvement, and guide supermarket management to invest in upgrading and enhancing their customers’ shopping experience.

Opinion: The programme for government is like a visit from Santa for cyclists

COULD IT REALLY be that Santa has arrived six months and one week ahead of schedule? In the programme for government, we are told that €1 million euro a day, every day, will be invested in safer cycling and walking during the lifetime of the next government.

This Opinion piece first appeared in TheJournal.ie on Thursday 25 June, 2020.

Image: Sascha Kohlmann/Wikimedia

Not so long ago, buses, vans and Ford Cortinas vroomed through the towns and cities of Ireland. Just two decades later, we hope to move ever closer to safe strolling, an abundance of food offerings, street conversations, and bike bells. Investment in cycling and walking in the programme for government is a smart and progressive deal for transport, health and revitalising town centres.

Hopefully, this time next year, we will have spent €360 million on cycling and pedestrian infrastructure, more than has ever been spent before. Investing almost €1 million a day, every day, for the lifetime of the programme for government means that people in Irish cities, towns, villages and suburbs will enjoy safer, more vibrant and attractive streets.

With an emphasis on quality and oversight, these efforts, if agreed and implemented, could make the places we live better for people, business, the environment and our sense of community.  

Cycling is the solution to a myriad of intimately intertwined social and economic problems of congestion, public health, and quality of life. And since cycling does not produce emissions, it reduces air pollution and carbon as well.

And as many of us rediscovered recently due to the coronavirus lockdown, cycling is social, fun, and inexpensive.

Cycling doesn’t make sense for everyone and that’s ok. But we want to get those within cycling distance to the places they need to be on a daily basis to feel cycling is a very real and very safe option. 

The bike boom of 2020

The bike boom of 2020 is a global phenomenon. Bicycles are sold as fast as they are assembled. People are waiting for bike orders to be delivered in August. Bike repair services are rammed.

With the absence of HGVs, vans, and the school commute during the lockdown, unoccupied roads turned into urban parks with families and small crews of happy teenagers strolling, cycling, and scooting.  Empty car parks became cycle training grounds for very young children. We have found that women, especially, felt a little braver when it came to cycling in this time:

“For the first time in 12 years,” said Anne Bedos of Café Rothar in Dublin’s Phibsborough, “we are selling more bikes to women than to men.”

Bikes are selling as fast as they can be assembled. Pictured: West Ireland Cycling, Galway’s Westend

More space, less speed

Everyone is a pedestrian, whether they’re standing at the bus stop or walking to their car. A safe street is where you’d let your five-year-old play with peace of mind. According to Prof. Kevin Leyden of NUI Galway, ‘‘If we want to get more people cycling, we need to make cycling feel safer. Key to that is slowing the speed of cars and providing a cycling infrastructure that reduces the probability that cyclists will be killed or injured by motorists.”  

If this programme for government goes ahead, towns with smart travel strategies will have funding and expertise to develop comprehensive networks of safe paths and attractive lanes connecting commuters to their workplaces and children and teenagers on safe routes to their schools. 

Residential areas need to be conveniently connected to retail and recreational spaces. Protected footpaths and cycle lanes need to be considered as ‘mobility lanes’ and be comfortable for people using wheelchairs, adapted bicycles and adult tricycles.

The seven new Regional Cycle Design Offices promised in the programme would expand and enhance the expertise available to support local authorities. Every local authority would be supported by a Cycling Officer. Along with the funding, this emphasis on expertise and quality infrastructure would be a game-changer.

Slow down

The commitment to reduce speed limits doesn’t grab headlines, yet slower speeds and their enforcement are a huge part of what it takes to get more people cycling and walking.

Mairéad Forsythe of Love 30, Ireland’s campaign for lower speed limits, says, “Reducing speed limits in towns, villages and cities to 30 km/h will make our roads safer for people walking and cycling. It lowers the risk of collisions and the risk of injuries. Most important of all, slower streets make our neighbourhoods more pleasant places to live, shop, and work, and for children to play.”

Dublin City already has cross-party support for a 30 km/h speed limit almost everywhere within the M50. If our capital city can decide to do this, so can every town, village and suburb. 

We want more people cycling, and more types of people cycling. Measuring only fatalities and injuries is crude. We need ambitious targets for children cycling to primary and secondary school, in particular teenage girls. In Ireland, just 2.1% of teenagers cycle to secondary school. In The Netherlands, that figure is 75%. 

Lessons from abroad

Fianna Fáil, Fine Gael and the Green Party have clearly incorporated international evidence into the programme for government. From Seattle to Sydney, cities are being radically reshaped in favour of people walking and cycling.

The Belgian port city of Ghent implemented a light, quick and cheap traffic circulation plan in 2017 and witnessed a 60% rise in cycle use. It reached its target of 35% cycling last year, 13 years earlier than planned for. There has been a 17% increase in restaurant and bar startups.

Galway city, towns and villages will now have the funds and expertise to build connected networks of safe and separate cycle baths. Photo: Galway Tourism

Before coronavirus, the Mayor of Paris unveiled her plans to transform Paris into a ‘15-minute city’ of self-sufficient neighbourhoods with grocery shops, parks, sports facilities, and schools just a walk or bike-ride away.  

Since then, Mayor Anne Hidalgo has urged ‘those who can’ to cycle plus announced a €300 million investment to install up to 650 km of new temporary and permanent bicycle lanes. This is about three times the length of the total Paris Métro network.

Return on investment

European research last year showed that every 1-kilometre drive costs the public purse €0.11 in terms of congestion, pollution, and time. Every 1-kilometre cycle brings a benefit of €0.18. Walking is even better. Each 1-kilometre walk adds €0.37 to economy and society in terms of improved public health, tourism, and quality of life.

Journey times

More than 23,000 people live within a 10 minutes cycle of Carlow Post Office, for instance. Over half of all journeys by adults in Ireland are 6 km or less, according to the Central Statistics Office. This is a comfortable distance on a bike for most people – providing you have a bike and a safe route to go where you want to go.

Over 76,000 people in Galway City live within a 30 min gentle cycle of Eyre Square. E-bikes will make commuting easier from Oranmore, Bearna and beyond.

Get bikes, get cycling

We need to help people purchase bikes and get cycling. The Cycle to Work Scheme is a good start. The same wide access for e-car grants must be made possible for bike grants. New help to buy e-bikes and cargo bikes is particularly welcome. Bike share schemes should be expanded and include e-bikes and e-scooters. 

“Sharing schemes are low cost and e-bikes help cities reduce congestion and meet climate change targets,” says Colin Barry, founder of Brite Mobility, Galway. “The motor’s assistance level attracts users who would have been afraid of the exertion of cycling before.”

So, what happens now?

Immediately, each local authority will be mandated to assess where road space can be re-allocated for walking and cycling. We want plans to be audited for quality and involve input from local communities.

Bike parking

Already, we have heard government radio ads asking us to cycle and walk where possible. Children need to be able to park their bikes at sports grounds.

Like wildflowers, we expect to see bike parking sprouting up everywhere – outside local shops, cafés, retail parks, parks, and beaches. Wherever bikes are tied to poles, there should be bike parking.

Bikes are good for business

Local businesses can request installation of quality bicycle stands from their local authorities. Customers by bike are local and loyal. Cycle parking delivers five times the retail spend per square metre than the same area of car parking, according to Transport for London research

Safe cycling for all

By this time next year, I hope we will have experienced a major cultural shift in transport policy, in moving people safely and sustainably around our towns, villages and cities. Cycling will be seen as the solution to congestion, a key contributor to better public health, and a powerful tool in developing a better quality of life for all of our people. 

Cycling has arrived and there’s no going back. Let’s pedal onwards to our new normal.

Martina Callanan is the spokesperson for Galway Cycling Campaign and a member of the Executive Council of Cyclist.ie – the Irish Cycling Advocacy Network, helps organise CycleCoffeeCake for women and novices on bikes, works in strategic communications, and tweets at @MartinaCallanan and @GalwayCycling.

World Bicycle Day – Rethinking Mobility: cycling for a safe Covid recovery

As part of UN World Bicycle Day, Galway Cycling Campaign will attend a special webinar on the topic of cycling for a safe Covid-19 recovery and beyond. We have sent an invitation to this event to members of the Galway’s City Mobility Team, all Galway TDs, and to all city and county councillors – and the public are also welcome to join.

A special webinar will take place tomorrow, Wednesday 3 June, to celebrate World Cycling Day and bring together. Rethinking Mobility: Cycling for a safe COVID-19 Recovery and beyond is organised by the European Cyclists’ Federation (ECF).

The event will present recommendations and discuss with leading decision-makers and cycling advocates how we can take advantage of the current crisis to rethink our urban mobility systems and redesign cities for good.  

The guest speakers are significant urban mobility specialists within Europe:

  • Karima Delli, MEP, Chair of Transport and Tourism Committee, European Parliament
  • Christophe Najdovski, Deputy Mayor for Transport and Public Space, City of Paris, and ECF President
  • Miguel Gaspar, Deputy Mayor for Mobility and Safety, City of Lisbon, Portugal
  • Saskia Kluit, Member of Dutch Senate and Director, Fietserbond, The Netherlands
  • Will Haynes, Infrastructure Director, Sustrans, United Kingdom
Karima Delli, MEP

The webinar ‘Rethinking Mobility: Cycling for a safe COVID-19 Recovery and beyond’ will take place on Wednesday 3 June 2020 for 90 minutes duration between 1pm and 2.30pm [14:00 – 15:30 CEST].

All are welcome to join. The event is highly recommended by the Galway Cycling Campaign.

Register here at the website of the European Cyclists’ Federation (ECF).

Galway Cycling Campaign is a member of the ECF through Cyclist.ie – the Irish Cycling Advocacy Network.

World Bicycle Day takes place on Wednesday, 3 June 2020

#ChangeOurStreets – submit your ideas directly to the City Mobility Team

Galway Cycling Campaign and the ‘Change Our Streets’ movement welcomes the online request and mapping tool for ideas to improve mobility in the city during coronavirus. It was made available today, Friday 22 May 2020, by Galway City Council and the City Mobility Team.

Screenshot of Galway City Council Mobility Team request form for social distancing measures with an easy to use map to identify locations

Galway City Council have developed a user friendly online request form to support social distancing during the Covid-19 pandemic.

Kevin Jennings, chairperson of Galway Cycling Campaign said, “We welcome this easy-to-use online form. We are glad that the Council have made the suggestions transparent and map-based, as we suggested in previous correspondence.”

All requests will be populated on a map of the city, so everyone can see requests submitted for areas of interest.

Categories for change: wider paths, lower speeds, space for cycling, cycle parking, maintenance, more space for queuing

Martina Callanan, spokesperson for Galway Cycling Campaign said, “We encourage everyone to use the online request form to support social distancing. If you are concerned about space at a bus stop, touching beg buttons at crossing, need a wider footpath in your residential area, or need space for cycling, you can make a specific request for a particular location. We suggest people bookmark this online form in their web browser to access it quickly and easily.”

She continued, “We welcome the categories for change which include requests for wider paths, lower speeds, space for cycling, cycle parking, maintenance, and more space for queuing. These changes to our streets will make our city safer and more pleasant for walking and cycling for people of all ages and all abilities.”

All requests will be made publicly available on a map on www.galwaycity.ie

Galway City Council says, “Please note this information will be made publicly available on a map on www.galwaycity.ie Please do not include any personal details, names or profanities in your submission.”

Galway City Council says that all requests will be carefully reviewed by the City Mobility Team (CMT) to identify which initiatives can be progressed safely. Galway City Council will update the status of requests, as they are reviewed by the CMT.

Yesterday, Thursday 21 May 2020, Galway Cycling Campaign submitted a 20 page document of 60+ specific suggestions to improve mobility during coronavirus.

#ChangeOurStreets – here’s our specific suggestions

Following wide engagement with residents, communities and businesses across the city, Galway Cycling Campaign has made a 20 page submission of specific suggestions to #ChangeOurStreets to improve mobility in Galway City during coronavirus.

Kevin Jennings, chairperson of Galway Cycling Campaign, said: “We received over 100 suggestions from people who live, work, study and trade in our city. We have reviewed, collated, filtered and reduced these to 60+ suggestions that could be quickly and cheaply implemented as per our city’s Roadmap and Framework mobility plans for Covid-19.”

Download here the Specific Suggestions to the City Mobility Team, submitted on Thursday 21 May 2020.

1 submission. 20 pages. 60+ suggestions.

The submission includes the idea that city centre streets be opened up to people walking and cycling through ‘Share With Care’ zones.

There are also ideas to tweak and complement the Galway Transport Strategy (2016) Primary Cycle and Greenway Network.

New creative ideas are need to improve mobility and maintain safe social distancing

Regarding road design and layout, there are suggestions to improve stacking lanes, roundabouts, traffic signal management, and traffic calming.

Galway Cycling Campaign and our #ChangeOurStreets supporters look forward to liaising closely with the City Mobility Team.